CNN and Georgia Tech Aiming for Drones to Cover News – Will FAA Allow?

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Over the past few years we’ve seen drones really take things up a notch. Nowadays they are being used for a myriad of purposes ranging from military to fun packed activities. Looking at such advanced uses of the drones it is no doubt that media titans are looking into making use of it for reporting purposes. This fact was further strengthened by the news that CNN and Georgia Tech are joining forces this summer in order to research on employing drones for news coverage.

FAA Drones

We all have read about how the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is taking strict measures against drones and laying down ground rules for them and that is exactly why the Georgia Tech and CNN collaborative team will be looking into accessing airspace via drones, personnel and safety issues after which these findings shall be shared with the FAA. This will help CNN to get a say in the rules being laid down by the FAA.

Drone flights

CNN’s Senior Vice President, David Vigilante, said; ‘Our hope is that by working cooperatively to share knowledge, we can accelerate the process for CNN and other media organizations to safely integrate this new technology into their coverage plans.’

CNN and Georgia Tech Drone Study 4

Drones will prove themselves far more efficient when it comes to covering particular stories, for example, areas where transportation is next to impossible the drones would be capable of flying in, recording and covering the area subsequently returning with valuable information. Another suggested use for the drones is investigative journalism. However, for all this to happen FAA must approve it beforehand. Fingers crossed for the time being and let’s see how the findings by the joint effort of CNN and Georgia Tech affect any rules being laid down by FAA.

CNN and Georgia Tech Drone Study 5

Do let us know what you think about this in the comments section; should CNN be allowed to use drones for news coverage by FAA or not?

 





  • Theodore B Nolan

    Google, ‘drone fly aways’.